Fantasy that Inspires

I think you can safely call me a fantasy racist. That might seem odd to say, but looking over the fantasy that inspires me, I realize that my interest in Tolkienesque race elements is rather low. I am frequently so fascinated with human elements that exploring other races, like Dwarves, Elves and Orcs, is pretty rare.

No, when it comes to fantasy, I am drawn to fantasy that mingles itself strongly with other common human elements, like economics and politics, religion and psychology. I enjoy the injection of horror into fantasy, the fusing of real world historic mythology. Truly gothic.

So here are several fantasy tales in various mediums that have inspired me. And if you’re looking for fresh materials to stimulate your muse, you can check them out too.

Vagrant Story

Vagrant Story

The Playstation era was a golden age for story telling. The mix of higher resolution graphics, more processing power and greater hardware capabilities was a mixed blessing in that some developers started to make their creations too scripted and cinema laden. But when they got it right, oh boy…

Vagrant Story was one such success story. Squaresoft (before it became Square Enix) created a few games set in a universe called Ivalice. Early games set in Ivalice, such as Final Fantasy Tactics and Vagrant Story were gold, but later Ivalice installments lost their touch as too many fantasy and political elements began to run way too rampant. But for a while in the PS1 golden age, it was unforgettable.

Vagrant Story was a blend of political intrigue in the battle between church and crown, set in the fictious and forgotten city of Leá Monde. The stunning architecture and history of the city meshed with with medieval scheming and grasping for ancient and forgotten powers hidden there. Yet in the depths and dark of the city were old horrors, age old fairy folklore brought to life and the dead who clung to the mortal realm. Meanwhile, the main character Ashley Riot struggles with illusive and untrustworthy memories.

Final Fantasy Tactics

Ramza_BeoulveSet in the same world of Ivalice, FFT was a masterpiece of tactically strategic gameplay and RPG elements. But the real meat of the game came from the real, thick plot. Rife with betrayals and backstabbing, political intrigue and a wide, motivated cast of characters, FFT was gaming meets Shakespeare. After the blood bath, you have such respect for the main character, Ramza Beoulve, for managing to survive such a world with his morals intact.

The story of FFT starts at the end of a war between two kings. A power vacuum has been left that various groups are trying to fill with their own chosen successors. But as it is set in a fantasy world, the leaders of the church choose to play with fire. The other reason the game is fantastic is because it also helps you think about fantasy elements from a strategic and battle point of view. Questions of how magic fits into a fight, the importance of terrain. These are things you don’t normally think about in fighting, but are factors that enrich ones view of pulp fantasy combat.

Try it if you can. You won’t regret it.

I promise you.

Berserk

Berserk

Any of my long time readers know of this manga series Berserk I go on about from time to time. Probably because it’s incredible. Probably because it positively screams ‘adult’ everytime I open it up. You see men and women at their best and at their worst in the story. The fantasy elements are just the side show to the important questions about man’s soul.

Nothing will make your writing feel so inadequate after you feast your eyes on this masterpiece of art and writing.

The story revolves around Guts, a mercenary who was betrayed by his father and falls into a group called the Band of the Hawk. The band’s efforts earn them prestige, and Griffin, their commander and Guts’ friend, is eventually made into a knight of Midland. But Griffin’s ambition proves his undoing when he sleeps with the princess of Midland, and ticks off the king.

The Band of the Hawk is almost destroyed. Guts manages to save Griffin, but all of this was the hand of fate in action. Due to events foreseen aeons ago, Griffin is offered the chance to ‘create his own kingdom’ by demonic forces. All it takes is a sacrifice… the Band of the Hawk. But Guts and another member survive the branding. And though Griffin is elevated to the status of a god, Guts sets out to take revenge upon him.

Guts’ quest for revenge is still on going. But events have conspired that have opened the door of fantasia. Old myths and tales that people thought weren’t true have begun to appear in all their glory and horror alike. Hydras, dragons, fairies. Some good, more for ill. Powerful questions of the human psyche and the belief in karma explain these events.

Trust me. Read it. You’ll understand why Berserk is the greatest fantasy work you’ll ever read.

Vampire Hunter D

Vampire Hunter DOh D, D, D… so much incredible potential. So much background and amazing world building. And yet, the barriers between America and Japan have made the transition so difficult for you.

Although there are more than two dozen novels, a video game and a couple of movies, few have been able to do this series justice. The video game was horrible. If I recall correctly, Playstation Magazine slammed it with 1 star out of 5. The novels from which the series originates were rich with story telling possibilities, but not well translated.

Believe it or not, the movies have been pretty good. The first, created back in 1985, was based on the first novel and filled with a great story even if the artwork is a bit dated now. The latest, Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust drew from the third book and is a jewel of animated movie making.

The series takes place sometime in 12,000 A.D. Humanity engaged in a nuclear war, and in the aftermath the nobility (vampires) took over. Although there were some much kindlier vampires, the majority of which were horrifying blood suckers.

Humanity is trying to recover, but the remains of the nobility (they are dying out) make it difficult. D is the greatest of the vampire hunters, being a dhampir.

Castlevania

GabrielCastlevania has been around for decades, as far back as the old Nintendo Entertainment System. But around the Playstation 2 era, Konami has made a real effort to apply more and more story telling elements to their gothic, vampire slaying series. There was Castlevania: Lament of Innocence which details one origin of Dracula, and Castlevania: Curse of Darkness, a side story revolving around Hector, a demon summoning man trying to escape Dracula’s legacy.

But Konami really hit gold with Castlevania: Lords of Shadow. A reboot of the series, Mercury Steam and Konami refreshed everything, transforming the game into a thick, shocking origin story of Dracula and the Belmont clan. The ending was particularly well done. The story designers kept pounding you with plot twist after plot twist. Maybe you saw something coming early on, but they didn’t stop until they got you with something you didn’t foresee.

But the real joy is coming in the sequel… where you’ll be playing as Dracula himself.

Final Fantasy VI

Well, I almost made a criminal mistake here. As I wrote this, I was tempted to leave it at five franchises, when I remembered that there was probably one more I should speak up about. I suppose the reason I almost forgot about Final Fantasy VI was that it was first an SNES title, as I never owned an SNES, only borrowed. And that it was so long ago that it was released, back in 1994. The previous titles are either still on going or have been reference via other works. Final Fantasy VI stands well on its own.

So what’s it about? I’ll give you the short of it in simple words. An empire. Steampunk. Rediscovery of magic. Genocide for power gain. Madness. A broken world. Family. Friends. Survival. Hope.

FFVI conflicts me. On one hand, I want to see it remade because the current generation of gamers needs to know the powerful story, strong characters and unforgettable world. If there’s such a thing as required reading, then FFVI is like required gaming. But on the other, it’s very likely that Square Enix could not do the original title justice.

I suppose that someone could do the remake properly… but I simply don’t know anyone in this age who could achieve the rights, has the needed capital, and is skilled enough at game design and story telling to pull it off. But bare in mind I would prefer them not to even touch the story. They would have to figure things out like the importance of cinematography in the transition from 2 to 3d, but the script and events? Unless you carefully (and I mean carefully) add more incredibleness to the tale somehow, to change anything would be tantamount to artistic heresy.

So I leave you now with a piece of art by Jimo Hazard, a rendering of a piece by Yoshitaka Amano, for you to think about.

Final Fantasy VI

Attack of the 50 Foot Bomb

The Mithran babes just wanted a day at the beach... but alas, it was not meant to be! ATTACK OF THE 50 FOOT BOMB!

The Mithran babes just wanted a day at the beach… but alas, it was not meant to be! ATTACK OF THE 50 FOOT BOMB!

I may have left Final Fantasy XI behind… but this, this just makes my day…

Anyway, I’m adding a fan run site for the work of Akihiko Yoshida to my links to the right. Or you can click here to see it for all I care. Final Fantasy XII was meh, but Vagrant Story and Final Fantasy Tactics remain gaming gold to this day. Vagrant Story in particular remains a powerful influence on my writing.

PS You can also check out some of the amazing scores for these games by Hitoshi Sakamoto. Here’s one for Vagrant Story, and another for Final Fantasy Tactics.

Oh What a Night

The Soldier doing CPR wrong.

The Soldier doing CPR wrong.

What a night.

Yesterday, I cracked open my Playstation 2 to try and realign the laser as well as do a spot of cleaning. I found a handy guide for it as well as a few Youtube videos. What sucks about that guide is that they were having picture problems yesterday, but I remembered enough when I first read the guide to repair it.

Sadly, my efforts didn’t bare much fruit. The PS2 games are working, as Metal Gear Solid 3 ran swimmingly. Vagrant Story didn’t boot when I finished although it did run earlier, and Escape from New York ran just once. Still, I don’t need the DVD player (I have another). I’d be content if the PS and PS2 games ran. I’m going to try some rubbing alcohol to touch up the laser next time.

Maybe I should consider a Playstation 3. They recently dropped the price to a tidy $250. I guess I worry about when it’s coming and how much the Playstation 4 will cost. I also want to play Metal Gear Solid 4 and a few other games, but Hideo Kojima is still being a tease about Zone of the Enders 3.

Earlier in the night I played more Team Fortress 2. My performance hasn’t been great lately, with a kill-to-death ratio of 1:1. When you factor assists into it (which I personally score as .5 kills), I’m not doing terrible. Still, I want to get better. Although the Pyro is still my favorite, the Soldier has really been growing on me as I start using the Equalizer and rocket jumps. What gets me about the Soldier is that it’s the perfect class for both beginners and experts, since the rockets are easy to understand but rocket jumps and the rest of the Soldier’s arsenal require some experience. That and making people’s heads a ‘splode.

Ahahah, Strong Bad. Maybe I should check out Poker Night at the Inventory. Oh, and Back to the Future. Damn you Steam!

Another 10 Music Pieces

So immediately after my last post giving 10 pieces of music for writing, I started another post with more music. It takes a little research to find good music with little or no lyrics, while trying to avoid re-using artists I have already mentioned before.

  1. Nothing Else Matters, by Apocalypta.
    “What, no Apocalypta?” MisterEd asked on the Shoutbox immediately after my last music listing. Self-induced cranial knockings commenced afterwards.
  2. Blade Runner Ending Theme, by Vangelis.
    You may find this hard to believe, but Ridley Scott is actually looking to do another movie set in the Blade Runner universe. I honestly don’t know how to take the news given that the sci-fi/noir flick is one of my all time favorites, and that Scott doesn’t seem to have ever done a sequel in his life. We will see what comes of this. Until then, enjoy the original sound track.
  3. Escape, by Craig Armstrong.
    Just when you think it’s over, they’re still coming after you! Run, you fools!
  4. Canabalt Theme, by Danny Baranowsky.
    Canabalt is a simple flash game that came out sometime back. All you do is jump, timing yourself to avoid obstacles and land safely on buildings. Click the link to play, but watch the clock: Your day could disappear playing this.
  5. Factory, Vagrant Story OST.
    Vagrant Story was a one of a kind game. A dungeon crawler influenced by Shakespearean plot writing with supernatural elements.  I have heard talk and discussion of sequels to Ashley Riot’s story, but looking at the direction the Final Fantasy series went after the tenth or eleventh title, I’m not interested.
  6. Escape from the Tavern, by James Horner.
    Willow. Now there’s a movie time forgot. Let’s face it, Hollywood has only started to be kinder to the fantasy genre in the last decade or so with stuff like the Harry Potter series. Still, there maybe some treasures in the soundtrack, if one is willing to look for them.
  7. Give them a shot. You may find your new favorite band.

    Give them a shot. You may find your new favorite band.

    Babylon of the Orient (instrumental version), by The Shanghai Restoration Project.
    The Shanghai Restoration Project is a great band whose discography continues to grow. Most of their music has some lyrics to it and always has an Asian flair. You may also want to check out the lyrical version of this piece.

  8. Just For Today, by Hybrid.
    Oh man, I actually almost don’t want to share Hybrid simply because of how amazing their work is and how much it inspires me. Still, if I like a band I should support them by passing the word along. This song makes me imagine flying and fighting, but if you want something trance and dark, try Dreaming Your Dreams.
  9. Metal Gear Solid 2 Theme, by Harry Gregson-Williams.
    The Metal Gear Solid series continues, but will be doing so without Solid Snake. I can’t blame Hideo Kojima. He was probably scared to death of some other producer butchering his favorite character. Still, damn good music though.
  10. Promise, by Akira Yamaoka.
    My favorite of the Silent Hill series of games was Silent Hill 2. But the music overall has never disappointed. Spooky and eerie, like a ghost tale told properly.