For a Rainy Day

So I’m actually stockpiling a few blog posts for later. One of the things I’m trying to do with my Horoscope here is actually maintain a consistent flow of posts and updates. I’m not the only one who does this of course. News papers actually write a draft of famous celebrities and movie stars that they update, waiting for the day that the celebrities dies to fill in the details and post. I however, will not be measuring people up for their coffin. Just filling out some reviews and guides for later.

Because I’ve finished Nemesis and am working on The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, my book reviews are probably going to be some more classic readings from the Warhammer universes. As in, stuff that I’ve already read. This way new fans can find the must reads, the what’s fun to read and what they should probably avoid. One of the most important things for Warhammer fans is going to be finding what’s considered “normal” within the universe.

I enjoy the Soul Drinkers, but the oddity of their tales will just confuse anyone fresh to 40k.

I enjoy the Soul Drinkers, but the oddity of their tales will just confuse anyone fresh to 40k.

Take the Soul Drinkers for instance. It’s interesting and highly unusual even for the Warhammer 40,000 universe. You get interested fans as well as divisive haters because the Soul Drinkers just don’t readily fit into the scheme of things. While this is fine for anyone who has an existing knowledge of the universe, for newbies it’s going to confuse them silly.

I’ve also started some sketch ideas for my second short story submission. After this window, I’m going to write a few things for other, regular online magazines in order to shake up my routine a bit and give me a bit of freedom.

Good times. Also, if you’re looking for a good tune, check this one by Within Temptation.

Nemesis

HEY KIDS BE SURE TO FLOSS OR I'LL COME FOR YOU!

GET ABOARD THE MURDER TRAIN!

Nemesis has been brewing on my book shelf for a long time. Staring at me with evil eyes. I can’t really explain why I was reluctant to read it. It may be the lack of huge names in the Dramatis Personae listing. Oh, you got Rogal Dorn, Malcador the Sigillite, Erebus and Valdor. But as you look at the huge cast of people you’ve never heard of, you just know that this story isn’t really about the big names. It also slows my roll that we all know that Horus didn’t meet his end with a bullet ventilating his skull. So part of me wondered, what’s the point of this book?

The first half of the book dives into Imperial politics, highlighting the Officio Assassinorium’s bickering and the usual mission to take the best and brightest from each of the six major houses to go after Horus. All of this is changes back and forth between the growing roster of the Execution Force and a murder investigation that is occurring on a distant planet. The book was getting boring around page 200 as Swallow took his time, giving each assassin a long introduction that allowed the reader to find out a little bit about each of the Execution and what their powers were.

On one hand, this really slowed down the pace of the book, even if it these scenes were laced with action. But on the other hand, I suddenly realized that there really hasn’t been that much writing on the various assassins of the Imperium. Execution forces are extremely, extremely rare occurrences. Daemonic incursions seem to happen more often. This was a prime chance to write about the Officio Assassinorium as a whole.

Although the book’s pace slowed, it suddenly redeemed itself half way through, just out of the blue. And began to move towards the overall purpose, building itself towards a climax laced with the theme that needed to be told in order to put some elements of the overall Horus Heresy in perspective. Much like the first three books, Horus Rising, False Gods and Galaxy in Flames, it turned out that there was an underlying theme within the Nemesis. It just waited until towards the end to really address it.

Nemesis proved to be a rewarding piece despite how open and closed it is. Sure, we all know that the mission posed is a failure, but it does reveal some crucial insights into the thinking within the Imperium and Horus. You could skip it, but you may miss something. If you haven’t already, check it out.

And now for the unofficial theme song to Nemesis. Complete with puppies.

My Eye…

This makes me so happy...

This randomly makes me so happy...

The review for Nemesis is 80% complete. Sadly, I scratched my eye a touch too hard. It hurts and is sensitive to light, so I got to give it a rest. All I’ve got for you is a short update today.

If you haven’t heard this month old news, Dawn of War III is on the way and according to a few sources, they’re looking to make it somewhat MMO-ish as well as allowing the player to collect and build their own armies. The developers are looking for something to make it vastly different from Starcraft II, whose expansions will make new content appear for the next 3 to 4 years at this rate.

Blizzard and Games Workshop have some history, if I’ve heard correctly. Supposedly, Blizzard originally wanted to do games for Games Workshop but after the dealings fell through, they ventured out to do their own thing. Thus, there are similarities between the two, especially early on. But since then, Blizzard has apparently moved away from visual similarities between GW’s intellectual property.

Me? I have no animosity towards either company. I enjoy most of their products. Blizzard’s lore is interesting, but the reason I buy their games is simply because they’re fun. When I say most however, it may surprise you to learn that I don’t like World of Warcraft or Warcraft in general. Sure, I loved Warcraft II. But the third installment got a touch too cartoony for me. I am much more a Starcraft and Diablo fan, Diablo especially for its dark tones.

I’ll probably write a more sourced article on it later this week, or next pending how long it takes my eye to heal. That’s all for now. Post tomorrow.

Yawn

Zzzzzz...

This puppy is a prince of evil! Of... (yaaaaaaaaaawn) .... ugh, evil... zzzz.

It’s been a chill day, working on some of my technical skills. I’m over half done with James Swallow’s Nemesis. The writing structure is similar to the back-and-forthery of Simon Spurrier’s Lord of the Night, but switching after a few paragraphs and not by chapters. The book was growing a bit boring around the 175 pages mark, but a little after page 200, redeemed itself. I’ll write a full review after I finish. My fictional reading list after includes Prospero Burns, Atlas Infernal and The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. I don’t want my list of books to grow too long. Reviews shall follow.

I should probably get started working on my pitches for the September submission window. ……soooooooooo lazy.

In the Beginning…

Chain swords cure everything.

Chain swords cure everything.

Started a new blog. I considered using Rots Your Brain for my writings as well, but I defined the scope of that as being for movies and television. To change its focus would be undesirable given its focus for mainstream appeal. Warhammer 40k isn’t mainstream, at least not yet… the attention that Space Marine is getting could really begin to change all that. Still, I hope the attention doesn’t go to the creator’s heads. It’s the hardcore fan base who will always be loyal, long after the more fickle fans have gotten over whatever caused the surge in popularity in the first place.

Anyway, I started this blog to keep my writing flowing. Many of the other Boltholers do the same, Pyro, Narry, Shadowhawk. But I need a spot where I can vent to myself the musings of the day, random thoughts and reactions to developing events within and about the 40k universe.

Recently, the submissions window closed after I had pitched three short stories and a novel submission. Of them, I’d say two of the short stories are decent. The last short story was surprisingly intensive, and I honestly have doubts that I could fit the full context of the story in less than 8,000 words. But then again, I think about what The Dark Knight was like or Memento, and recognize that there is a lot of story going on there as well (I am also biased as a huge Christopher Nolan fan). Then again, so did Spider Man 3. Still, I would venture to say that it is better to have too much story than too little, because no one would want to read a snooze fest.

Almost immediately after the contest ended, I went on a reading binge. I read A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess, and posted a comparison of it against Gav Thorpe’s The Last Chancers. I completed reading Robinson Crusoe by Daniel DeFoe (not to be confused with William).  I slayed Zombieslayer by Nathan Long and am working my way through Nemesis by James Swallow. I’m trying to mix up my fiction with non-fiction, and also mix some more classic reading on top of that. Part of me is trying to avoid becoming an easily satisfied reader, when simply finishing a book automatically makes it worth reading in my opinion. That’s not always the case. Not every book is amazing, and adding another notch to my book shelf is nothing to be proud of.

My hero.

My hero. ❤

But reading the classics like Robinson Crusoe and A Clockwork Orange has the benefit of allowing me to identify and craft stronger themes into my work. It’s… easy to get lost and simply write what some call “warnography”, when the writing is produced simply to satisfy a person’s craving for action. An excellent story should do that and much more. Still, I suppose as long as the reader is entertained, the job is done.

Who inspires me? In the Black Library crew, my favorite authors are Nathan Long, Gav Thorpe and C.L. Werner. What’s amusing is that these three have veered more towards the Warhammer Fantasy than the 40k universe, but Nathan Long’s plot crafting skills are second to none. CL Werner’s enthusiasm for Robert Howard draws me to him every time. And Gav Thorpe’s story telling… The Last Chancers remains my favorite work in the Black Library despite how old it is. Outside of the Black Library, Christopher Nolan and Darren Aronofsky influence what I want to see. George Orwell, William H. Keith Jr and Robert Howard the other works.

I like to think that reading non-fiction can improve your fiction. When you understand the functions of political-economic structures, I feel you can construct more elaborate worlds within the 40k universe. Dan Abnett does so beautifully when he devises the structure of a hive-city’s political scene. It’s a talent that makes the world more complete, more realistic than the predictable black and white, evil vs good concepts that have little more to offer than the physical struggle against the other half.

Besides, it’s not like there’s any side I would call “good” in the 40k universe. To quote Darth Helmet, “So, Lone Star, now you see that evil will always triumph because good… is dumb. “