Chaos Music Tributes: Slaanesh

The prince of excess.

The prince of excess.

My friend Dan once asked me what is the real threat of Slaanesh. Pleasure is what humans tend to seek on their own, so what’s the harm in it?

At the time, the easiest answer I could give was good ol’ fashioned STDs. But that treads upon Nurgle’s gifts at bad times. Yeah, STDs can be dangerous, but what else? How can Slaanesh be dangerous of his own volition?

It was a question I’ve quietly watched people over, trying to find the answer.

And since that day, I’ve come across dozens of tiny examples. Slaanesh is not the lord of a thousand temptations for nothing. And none of them could easily take a person over the edge. But when either they start to mingle, or one is pursued to the brink of self destruction, you begin to see the real threat that Slaanesh can be to the soul.

The simple answer is, “Obsession is excess.”

I think if there is any director in Hollywood who understands the threat of Slaanesh’s appeal, it would have to be Darren Aronofsky. From Black Swan, The Wrestler and especially Requiem for a Dream, Aronofsky has repeatedly proven that he understands the dangers of unchecked obsessions and the cliff they can send you flying from. There is an underlying psychology behind what drives many of these poor souls; a taste of the pleasures of considerable excess, followed by the pit of failure and hope to rekindle the fire that was lost, regardless of what the cost would be. And on the screen, he explains that best.

The pleasures of Slaanesh know a fairly wide number of symbols. Art, music, drugs and alcohol, sex, and food to start. What’s surprising is that these things are so mundane. We all need food, are exposed to art and music, we occasionally partake in alcohol and some of us do drugs or sex. The danger comes from overdoing any of these things.

You can drink yourself to death, overdose on drugs or alcohol. When a person pursues the perfection of art and music, it is quite possible that they can forget to do the things necessary to life, hence a twist on the phrase “starving artist.” And when people get bored of plain, ordinary sex, they can find themselves increasingly tempted towards more potentially painful, if not dangerous, acts.

As you might imagine, song writers and musicians have a strong affinity for Slaanesh, so it’s not difficult to find music that really fits the bill. Still, there maybe a few goodies in here you’ve never heard before. As before, a playlist is on the bottom, and songs with asterisks (*) are songs without lyrics.

  1. Bad Romance, by Lady Gaga. (You may also want to check out this cover by Halestorm if you don’t like this version.)
  2. Requiem for a Dream Remix, by Clint Mansell remix by Prince Negaafellaga.*
  3. Running Up That Hill, by Placebo.
  4. Don’t You Ever, by Republica.
  5. The Beginning is the End is the Beginning, by The Smashing Pumpkins.
  6. The Show Must Go On, by Queen.

Bow to the prince of excess.

The Writing Jukebox

"To answer your question, it's about this big."

"To answer your question, it's about this big."

Today, I’m breaking a cardinal rule.

In the past, almost all of my music for writing entries have centered around a “no lyrics” approach. Now I’m breaking the rule this one time. Sometimes, certain songs lyrics just fit a circumstance so well that it’s worth the distraction.

Now the big thing about music of this kind is that it’s better for listening to in order to get ideas, rather than something to occupy your mind. You may want to let yourself feel whatever you’re going to get from the music, and then get to writing first.

  1. Homeward, by VNV Nation.
    I used to listen to VNV Nation all the time, and despite being somewhat depressive in some songs, it help me through some break ups way in the past. Homeward tends to be one of the more hopeful pieces.
  2. Vida la Vida, by Coldplay.
    I am not a Coldplay fan. Not by a long shot. But they got this particular song right. It discusses the ups and downs of politics, useful if you want to look at civilization as a whole.
  3. Casino Royale – You Know My Name, by Chris Cornell.
    I’ve never been a fan of the 007 movie series. Even Daniel Craig, an action actor worthy of a respectable nod could not draw me into the series.  But Chris Cornell absolutely floored me this with song.
  4. Don’t Stop Me Now, by Queen.
    This song made a recent come back thanks to Simon Pegg and Nick Frost‘s amazing, amazing take on zombie movies. This song makes you fly. If you’re looking to create a scene that oozes of fast, high good times. Whether or not you’re a Team Fortress 2 fan, you may want to check out the alternative music video ‘Don’t Stab Me Now’ because the song quality is better, although there are a few voice drops.
  5. I Don’t Wanna, by Within Temptation.
    I love Within Temptation. I’ve been a fan for a very long time. This particular song just takes off and sets you up for some incredible vocals by Sharon den Adel. Try it. You’ll like it.
  6. Macross Plus – Information High, by Yoko Kanno.
    Macross makes me nostalgic because it was my favorite show growing up. American fans better know it as Robotech, but Macross Plus was there when I turned into a teenager, and kept the tradition going. Information High, by Yoko Kanno, hits a pulse pounding high of techno and lyrics. I recommend this for futuristic stuff and yes, dog fighting.
  7. Ages old. But still beautiful to look at.

    Ages old. But still beautiful to look at.

    Terra’s Theme (Orchestral with Lyrics), Final Fantasy VI.
    Final Fantasy VI. Some say it was the last real Final Fantasy. Others say it was merely the last of a generation before taking off into something new. But regardless of which camp you belong too (if either), you will probably enjoy this beautiful piece. Even despite it being in Japanese. If not because of it.

  8. Dance in the Dark, by Lady Gaga.
    In case this video confuses you, that isn’t actually Gaga. That is Lizalo Galama, who created this video as a fan project. The reason it’s confusing is because of how much it actually looks like something Gaga would make. There’s something a little depressing to this song despite how upbeat it is. You may find it useful.
  9. Story, by Lene Marlin.
    This is a slow and sorrowful piece. Like looking over a tragic life. My favorite part is just around 3:05.
  10. Somebody Save Me, by Krypteria.
    I think of travel on this one. I like the vocals and lyrics despite how depressing it can be.